Time Unfolded: A Late Medieval Concertina Calendar in the Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin (Libr. pict. A 92)

Gastbeitrag von Dr. Sarah M. Griffin

The diffusion of mechanical clocks in fourteenth-century Europe introduced new systems of tracking time. Many of these converged in late medieval calendars, which contain details of the yearly cycle that were calculated by astronomical observation and ordered through liturgical routine. During this period, the calendar broke free from its traditional book form and came to be found in scrolls, almanacs, atlases, printed books, disks within astronomical clocks, painted triptychs and even hunting knives. A particularly interesting example of these new forms are concertina calendars: manuscripts that included pictorial expressions of the calendar that could be folded out like an accordion in order to be read.

The Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin houses one of these rare manuscripts: Libr. pict. A 92 (available to view online), which I have come to call the ‘Berlin calendar’. Made around 1400 in central Germany, the Berlin calendar consists of one large, folded piece of vellum. On one side is a pictorial saints’ calendar (a month of which is shown in the banner above) where the most important feast days are illustrated. Usually they are depicted as the bust of a saint who is celebrated on that day, such as Saint Barbara on the left, who holds a tower. On the other side of the vellum (image 1) are the labours of the months, each undertaking an activity suitable for that month, and signs of the zodiac accompanied by curious circular diagrams that, through their varying degrees of fullness, express the average hours of daylight and darkness for each month. The latter are particularly revealing as to contemporary time-keeping practises.

Image 1

Image 1: Labours of the months and wheels of daylight and darkness from January to March. – Detail of Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin, Libr. pict. A 92, Germany (c. 1400) – Public Domain

During a two-month stay at the Staatsbibliothek from July to August 2019, I tasked myself to better understand the Berlin calendar and how it would have been used in the Middle Ages by considering it within a group of similar concertinas. In addition to forming a focused analysis of the function of concertina manuscripts, their study informed a larger project on the role of different forms of calendar in daily time-keeping during the fifteenth century.

Concertina manuscripts, sometimes referred to as accordion books, provide rich and fascinating insight into the reading practices of the later Middle Ages while showing the potential of the manuscript medium to render complex and interactive three-dimensional forms. They must be unfolded to be read, and are designed in such a way that they can be unfolded in various orientations to reveal different sets of content. This structure provided the medieval maker with the potential to link different pockets of information through the multiple ways in which the manuscript could be folded and unfolded. The Berlin calendar is a particularly important manuscript for the understanding of how concertinas were read because it is still in its folded form, whereas many others have been unfolded and mounted onto boards to ensure they cannot be folded again. Although the manuscript has been digitised, it was absolutely essential that it was consulted in the flesh for the multiple patterns of its unfolding to be understood. The fragility of the parchment and the repetitive unfolding and refolding of its parts meant it could only be consulted four times over the Summer, making my time with the manuscript even more precious.

Image 2: Detail of Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin, Libr. pict. A 92, Germany (c. 1400), unfolding February, Photo: Sarah Griffin; CC-BY-NC-SA

Image 2: Detail of Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin, Libr. pict. A 92, Germany (c. 1400): Unfolding February. – Photo: Sarah Griffin; CC-BY-NC-SA

Research on folded medieval manuscripts has flourished in recent years, thanks in part to the publication of J. P. Gumbert’s ‘Bat Books’: a catalogue of folded manuscripts that Gumbert worked on from the 1990s onwards, only to be published shortly before his death in 2016. Gumbert managed to consult almost every single of the sixty‑three folded manuscripts surviving, barring just three. From his first-hand experience of their handling, he created the wonderful term ‘bat book’ to describe them, as ‘when in rest they hang upside-down and all folded up, but when action is required they lift up their heads and spread their wings wide’. Gumbert’s work led me to study concertinas in other collections, including a Dutch concertina calendar in the Germanisches Nationalmuseum (Nuremburg) made almost contemporaneously to that now in Berlin.

By consulting these calendars both in person and online I was able to identify eight manuscripts (from Gumbert’s twenty‑one concertinas) that share the same model. Studying the Berlin calendar within this group was like piecing together a three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle. I used the content and layout of the other manuscripts to evaluate which parts of the Berlin calendar were missing, if any at all. As well as providing potential sources for it, the unique features of the Berlin calendar could also be identified. Not only is it the only surviving German concertina, it is also the only calendar not to contain the Golden Numbers, which are essential to calculate the moveable feast dates, such as Easter. This raises the question of whether it is unfinished or whether it was made for a different purpose. The findings of this research will form an article on the reading practices of this particular model of concertina calendar and where the Berlin calendar fits into the group.

In addition to informing this dedicated study, the two-month stay in Berlin allowed me to visit other German collections that hold objects of primary significance to the larger project. Building upon previous research on a monumental calendar from Verona that is associated with the earliest astronomical clocks (the published outcome of which is available online), I was glad to consult a large wooden calendar disk made for Lübeck’s first astronomical clock, originally in the Marienkirche (Lübeck, St. Annen‑Museum, c. 1461, Inv. no. 1892‑145); a large calendar volvelle in the form of a triptych (Nuremburg, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, 1461, Inv. no. WI58); and a sixteenth-century hunting knife made by Ambrosius Gemlich, into which he etched a beautifully-detailed liturgical calendar (Munich, Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, Inv. no. 13/1174, see image 3). However, it was not always necessary to leave Berlin. The Staatsbibliothek houses many other calendrical curiosities, including a sixteenth-century wooden calendar (Libr. Pict. A 75, see image 4) whose saints’ calendar is similar in format to the Berlin calendar.

Image 3: Munich, Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, Inv. no. 13/1174, sixteenth century, calendar etched into a hunting knife by Ambroisius Gemlich, detail of January, February, April and May, Photo: Sarah Griffin; CC-BY-NC-SA

Image 3: Calendar etched into a hunting knife by A. Gemlich, 16th c.: Detail of January, February, April and May. – Munich, Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, Inv. no. 13/1174 – Photo: Sarah Griffin; CC-BY-NC-SA

 

Image 4: Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin, Libr. pict. A 75, sixteenth century, Detail of wooden calendar showing February, Photo: Sarah Griffin; CC-BY-NC-SA

Image 4: Detail of wooden calendar showing February, 16th c. – Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin, Libr. pict. A 75 – Photo: Sarah Griffin; CC-BY-NC-SA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From the selection of calendars mentioned above, one can observe the variety of forms in which they were crafted during this period. Their first-hand analysis can reveal how time was ordered and understood in the late Middle Ages, a period defined by the introduction of mechanical time-keeping and in which the methods of measuring time were in transition.

 

Associated sources:

P. J. Becker, Aderlaß und Seelentrost: Die Überlieferung deutscher Texte im Spiegel Berliner Handschriften und Inkunabeln (Mainz, 2003), pp. 378‑80, no. 181

J. Borland, ‘Moved by Medicine: The Multisensory Experience of Handling Folded Almanacs’, in Sensory Reflections: Traces of Experience in Medieval Artifacts, ed. by F. Griffiths and K. Starkey (Berlin, 2018), pp. 204‑24.

S. M. Griffin, ‘Synchronising the Hours: A fifteenth-century wooden volvelle from the Basilica of San Zeno, Verona’, in Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, LXXXI (Dec., 2018), pp. 31‑67

J. P. Gumbert, Bat Books: A Catalogue of Folded Manuscripts Containing Almanacs or Other Texts (Turnhout, 2016)

Erik Kwakkel, ‘The Incredible Expandable Book’, accessible at medievalbooks, https://medievalbooks.nl/tag/accordion-book/

C. Silva, ‘Opening the Medieval Folding Almanac’, in Exemplaria, 30:1 (2018), pp. 49‑65

R. Wieck, The Medieval Calendar: Locating Time in the Middle Ages (New York, 2017)

 

Frau Dr. Sarah M. Griffin, Winchester College, war im Rahmen des Stipendienprogramms der Stiftung Preußischer Kulturbesitz im Jahr 2019 als Stipendiatin an der Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin. Forschungsprojekt: “Hours of Daylight, Hours of Darkness: The Visualisation of Time in a Late Medieval Almanac (Libr. pict. A 92)”

Der indische König Dschali’ad auf dem Sterbebett mit seinem Sohn Wird-Khan

Tausendundeine Nacht: Eine illuminierte ägyptische Papierhandschrift des 17. Jahrhunderts: Kunsttechnologische Untersuchung und Restaurierung

Ein Gastbeitrag von Ina Fröhlich, Köln

Die Handschrift bildet einen Auszug aus den Märchen aus Tausendundeiner Nacht. Sie wurde in Ägypten für einen unbekannten Auftraggeber hergestellt. Auch über den Schreiber ist leider nichts bekannt. Trotzdem lassen sich über die verwendeten Materialien und Gebrauchsspuren einige Schlüsse über die Entstehung und Geschichte der Handschrift ziehen.
In einem zweijährigen Masterprojekt am Institut für Restaurierung und Konservierung der Technischen Hochschule in Köln wurde diese Handschrift unter kodikologischen und kunsttechnologischen Aspekten untersucht und auf Basis dieser Erkenntnisse ein Restaurierungskonzept entworfen, welches erfolgreich auf die Handschrift angewendet werden konnte.

Buchblock
Das Büttenpapier, aus dem sich der Buchblock zusammensetzt, zeigt Wasserzeichen, die bei der Herstellung des Papiers entstehen und einen Hinweis auf den Ort und den Zeitraum der Herstellung liefern. Über diese Wasserzeichen konnte ermittelt werden, dass das Papier im 17.Jh. in einer französischen Papiermühle hergestellt wurde und für den Export in den arabischen Raum bestimmt war.
Die häufige Nutzung der Handschrift führte zu zahlreichen Rissen im Papier. Zahlreiche Reparaturen im Falzbereich der Blätter weisen darauf hin, dass sich Seiten gelöst haben.
Die Doppelseiten des Buchblocks, die zuvor in einer Kettstichheftung geheftet waren, wurden separiert und erhielten eine Klebebindung, wie sie noch heute für Taschenbücher gebräuchlich ist. Als Klebstoff wurde zu dieser Zeit ein Proteinleim verwendet.
Der großzügig aufgetragene und versprödete Leim sowie die zahlreichen Reparaturen im Falzbereich führen dazu, dass sich die Handschrift nicht mehr gut aufschlagen ließ. Sogar Risse durch das Papier mit den Buchmalereien sind festzustellen.
Um weitere Risse zu verhindern und die Handschrift besser aufschlagen zu können, muss die Leimschicht entfernt und die Einzelblätter wieder zu Lagen zusammengesetzt werden. Diese Lagen können daraufhin wieder geheftet werden, was das Aufschlageverhalten verbessert.
Risse und Fehlstellen müssen geschlossen werden, um ein weiteres Einreißen zu verhindern.
Werden zwei Einzelblätter wieder mit Papierstreifen zu Doppelblättern zusammengefügt, entsteht ein enormer Volumenzuwachs dort, wo sich die Papiere überschneiden. Das muss so weit es geht verhindert werden, da der Buchblock wieder in seinen ursprünglichen Einband zurückgeführt werden soll. Eine Abnahme der historischen Reparaturen im Falzbereich war daher notwendig. An einigen Stellen wurden die historischen Reparaturen im Falzbereich nur gekürzt, wo es nötig war.
Durch eine ausgiebige fotografische Dokumentation durch die Digitalisierung der Handschrift in einem vorangegangenen Projekt ist die Lage der historischen Reparaturen nachvollziehbar. Alle Reparaturen in anderen Bereichen des Blattes, vor allem an den Ecken und Kanten wurden als historische Zeugnisse belassen. Durch die Abnahme der historischen Reparaturen konnte viel Platz für das zusätzliche Papier und die Heftung gewonnen werden. Außerdem wurde beschlossen, nur ein sehr dünnes, transparentes Japanpapier für die Zusammenfügung der Einzelblätter zu verwenden. Da die ehemaligen Doppelblätter im Falzbereich sehr uneinheitlich gerissen waren, überlagern sich jedoch das dünne, transparente Japanpapier mit dem Büttenpapier der Handschrift. Dessen opaker Ton kommt unter dem transparenten Papier hervor, sodass die Fehlstelle nicht mehr so deutlich ins Auge fällt. Trotzdem sind die Spuren der historischen „Reparaturmaßnahme“ für den aufmerksamen Betrachter nachvollziehbar. Die Verwendung des Japanpapiers bedeutet auch einen enormen Zuwachs an Flexibilität, der mit Ergänzungen aus Büttenpapier so nicht möglich geworden wäre. Nun lässt sich der Buchblock problemlos vollständig aufschlagen.

Tinte und Kupfer
Die Tinte besteht aus einer Mischung aus einer Eisengallustinte und einer Rußtusche.
Bei einer Eisengallustinte kann das Phänomen des Tintenfraßes vorkommen, welcher das Papier regelrecht zerfrisst. Daher müssen Maßnahmen getroffen werden, um den Schaden, der hier noch nicht weit fortgeschritten ist, so früh wie möglich einzudämmen.
Die Rußtusche ist wasserlöslich, sodass eine sehr feuchte Behandlung der Tinte dazu führen kann, dass die Tinte ausgeschwemmt wird.

Das grüne Pigment besteht aus einem Kupferchlorid. Dieses kann nicht nur den Kupferfraß ausbilden, ein ganz ähnliches Phänomen wie das des Tintenfraßes, sondern auch den Tintenfraß verstärken. Schäden lassen sich vor allem an den Stellen der Seite erkennen, an denen auf der einen Seite des Blattes eine grüne Malerei, auf der anderen Seite des Blattes in derselben Höhe, Schrift aus schwarzer Tinte aufeinandertreffen. Die Restaurierung der Handschrift muss daher beide Phänomene berücksichtigen.

Versuchsreihe
Um eine geeignete Methode zu entwickeln, dem Fraßschaden entgegenzuwirken, wurde eine Testreihe mit Probekörpern begonnen. Damit ist es möglich, die entwickelte Behandlung auf ihre Stabilität unter starken Klimaschwankungen zu überprüfen. Auch wenn die Schäden Tinten- und Kupferfraß bereits seit langer Zeit bekannt sind und untersucht werden, gibt es immer wieder neue Erkenntnisse über den Schadensverlauf. Daher muss ein eigens auf dieses Objekt abgestimmtes Verfahren entwickelt werden, bei dem die Wasserlöslichkeit der Tinte, die Fragilität und Zusammensetzung der Farben, ein gutes Alterungsverhalten der verwendeten Inhaltsstoffe und der Eignung für beide Arten der chemischen Fraßschäden entspricht.
Getestet wurden daher verschiedene Proteine, die ohnehin bereits so oder so ähnlich bei der Herstellung der Handschrift verwendet wurden und deren Alterungsverhalten dadurch bekannt ist. Verschiedene Auftragsverfahren wurden an den Probekörpern getestet und einem künstlichen Alterungszyklus ausgesetzt, in dem eine erhöhte und schwankende Temperatur und Luftfeuchte Schäden in dem Probekörper hervorruft und daher erkennen lässt, wo die Schwachstellen der entwickelten Methode liegen.
Verschiedene kunsttechnologische Untersuchungsmethoden bestätigen nicht nur den Erfolg der Methode, sondern geben auch Einblicke in einen möglichen Verlauf des Schadens, da die Probekörper im Gegensatz zum Original auch invasiv und destruktiv untersucht werden können. Damit stehen deutlich mehr und genauere Untersuchungsmittel zur Verfügung, als sie bei der Handschrift selbst angewandt werden konnten.

Einband
Der Einband ist neueren Ursprungs. Die Reste einer Urkunde, die zur Verstärkung des Buchblocks verwendet wurde, nennt ein Datum (1749) und ist in Frankreich zu verorten. Da die Urkunde zweckentfremdet wurde, kann davon ausgegangen werden, dass sie einige Jahrzehnte nach ihrer Entstehung ihre Gültigkeit verlor und für die Reparatur des Buches verwendet wurde. Auch die Technik und die Gestaltung des Einbandes lassen darauf schließen, dass das Buch Ende des 18. oder Anfang des 19.Jh. neu gebunden wurde. Die Gestaltung des Einbandes, insbesondere mit der Mandorla, die das Mittelfeld des Einbandes verziert, lehnt sich an orientalische Vorbilder an, wurde aber in europäischer Technik hergestellt.
Das Einbandleder war versprödet und zeigt Spuren eines säurebedingten Zerfalls. Ein Festigungsmittel wurde aufgetragen, um vor weiteren Abpulverungen und Verfärbungen zu schützen. Die Risse und Fehlstellen im Einband wurden mit Leder und Japanpapier ergänzt.

Abbildung 1 Diese Darstellung zeigt das schlechte Aufschlageverhalten der Handschrift. Die helleren Papiere stellen alte Reparaturen dar, die z.T. sehr großflächig ausfallen.

Abbildung 1 Diese Darstellung zeigt das schlechte Aufschlageverhalten der Handschrift. Die helleren Papiere stellen alte Reparaturen dar, die z.T. sehr großflächig ausfallen.

Abbildung 2 Durch die Spannungen der Klebebindung und des relativ steifen Papiers bildeten sich Risse im Falzbereich.

Abbildung 2 Durch die Spannungen der Klebebindung und des relativ steifen Papiers bildeten sich Risse im Falzbereich.

Abbildung 3 Die Restaurierung ermöglicht einen guten Aufschlagwinkel der Handschrift. Risse im Bereich der Miniaturen wurden rückseitig mit einem beschichteten Spezialpapier gesichert.

Abbildung 3 Die Restaurierung ermöglicht einen guten Aufschlagwinkel der Handschrift. Risse im Bereich der Miniaturen wurden rückseitig mit einem beschichteten Spezialpapier gesichert

Abbildung 4 Detailaufnahme von fol. 24v. Die Kante jedes einzelnen Blattes, wie hier bei fol.24v zu sehen, ist etwa 1cm breit von einer starken Klebstoffschicht überzogen. Die Klebstoffschicht führt zu Verwellungen des Papiers und musste abgenommen werden.

Abbildung 4 Detailaufnahme von fol. 24v. Die Kante jedes einzelnen Blattes, wie hier bei fol.24v zu sehen, ist etwa 1cm breit von einer starken Klebstoffschicht überzogen. Die Klebstoffschicht führt zu Verwellungen des Papiers und musste abgenommen werden.

Abbildung 5 Durch die Abnahmen der Reparaturen im Falzbereich wurde die Stärke der Fragmentierung der Blattkante sichtbar. Der Japanpapierstreifen verbindet die beiden Einzelblätter und sichert gleichzeitig die Blattkante, ohne dass es dabei zu einem starken Volumenzuwachs kommt.

Abbildung 5 Durch die Abnahmen der Reparaturen im Falzbereich wurde die Stärke der Fragmentierung der Blattkante sichtbar. Der Japanpapierstreifen verbindet die beiden Einzelblätter und sichert gleichzeitig die Blattkante, ohne dass es dabei zu einem starken Volumenzuwachs kommt.

 

 

Abbildung 6 Der Falzbereich wirkt im Lagenverbund nicht mehr so transparent, da der Farbton der anderen Blätter durch das Japanpapier scheint.

Abbildung 6 Der Falzbereich wirkt im Lagenverbund nicht mehr so transparent, da der Farbton der anderen Blätter durch das Japanpapier scheint.

“Ich bin nach Weisheit weit umher gefahren”- ein Museum für Chamisso

Adelbert von Chamisso (1781-1838), der Dichter der Romantik, Naturforscher, Botaniker, und Weltreisende schrieb:

Ich bin Franzose in Deutschland und Deutscher in Frankreich, Katholik bei den Protestanten, Protestant bei den Katholiken, Jakobiner bei den Aristokraten und bei den Demokraten ein Adliger… Nirgends gehöre ich hin, überall bin ich der Fremde.“

Seit dem 13. April 2019 hat Chamisso eine Heimstatt. Nach jahrelangen Bemühungen wurde in der ehemaligen Dependance des einstigen Cunersdorfer Schlosses unter großer Beteiligung von Mitgliedern des Fördervereins Kunersdorfer Musenhof, Spendern und Vertretern der Politik das weltweit erste Chamisso-Museum eröffnet.

Es befindet sich in Kunersdorf im Oderbruch, idyllisch zwischen Berlin und Frankfurt an der Oder gelegen.

Das eigentliche Schloss Cunersdorf wurde im Krieg zerstört, doch den Schlosspark von Peter Joseph Lenné gibt es noch, hier finden wir einen Gedenkstein für Chamisso.

Bei schönem Wetter sitzt man auch im Garten, unterm Obstbaum, und kann im Faksimile der Novelle “Peter Schlemihls wundersame Geschichte” lesen.

Die farbenfrohe und elegante Ausstellung im Museum zeigt in 5 Räumen Leben und Werk des Künstlers, der mehrere Monate im Cunersdorfer Schloss weilte und dort 1813 die zur Weltliteratur gehörende Novelle schrieb.

Schlemihl Bl. 5r

 

Das ist  unsere Handschrift, „Peter Schlemiels Schicksale“ Ms. germ. qu. 1809,  und auch  der Erstdruck von 1814  werden hier  vorgestellt. In einem eigenen Raum werden alle gedruckten Ausgaben des Werkes präsentiert.

Einen Zugang zum gesamten Nachlass Chamissos bieten die digitalisierten Sammlungen der Staatsbibliothek. Denn der Nachlass des Dichters und Jahrhundert-Forschers hat schon lange in der Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin seine Heimstatt gefunden.

Doch auch diese Papiere haben eine weite Reise hinter sich: Der während des II. Weltkrieges ausgelagerte Nachlass wurde nach Kriegsende beschlagnahmt und an die Lenin-Bibliothek in Moskau übergeben. 1958 erfolgte die Rückgabe des Nachlasses an die damalige Deutsche Staatsbibliothek in Berlin. Im Verbundkatalog Kalliope wurden nun sämtliche Lebenszeugnisse, Manuskripte und Korrespondenzen Chamissos aus dem Besitz der Staatsbibliothek archivalisch und wissenschaftlich erschlossen, seit 2014 ist der Nachlass online verfügbar.